Research Presentations

Next week you all will present your semester research projects to the class. Let me explain my goals and expectations for the presentation, and provide a rubric for the assignment. As always, please don’t hesitate to email me with ANY questions – I am happy to clarify, as needed.

a. This is worth 10% of your grade.

b. You have 5-8 minutes. You cannot go over 8 minutes. You MUST practice & time your presentation.

c. You don’t have enough time to tell us everything. So what will you tell us? Be selective, be thoughtful. Consider what the story is that you want to tell us, and what the most important parts of that story are. For example, is the juicy bit the disconnect between what the news media say, and what you saw during your field work? Or is the most exciting part when you were able to compare what you found in statistics with what scholars concluded? Or do you want to talk us through the highlights of your 3 types of data?

**Whatever you tell the class about your project will be all they know. So, consider providing a completed, short narrative.

**Be guided by your time constraints, and by a desire to share the interesting bits with your classmates.

d. DO NOT READ YOUR PAPER.

e. Visuals are FINE, and in fact may be very appropriate! But make sure you are in class early enough to prepare your visuals before presentations start for the day. We do NOT have time for loading powerpoints, etc. during the presentations.

f. I cannot tell you the one format that will be most effective. BUT: your best bet is to organize your presentation around your research question. Then craft the rest of your presentation around how YOU have come to answer your research question.

 

Here are some general guidelines (I’ll attach a word document, and here is the text:)

Research Presentation Guidelines

This presentation should focus on explaining your research question, your key findings and conclusions, and the importance or relevance of these conclusions.

This presentation will serve two purposes: (1) it will allow the class to learn about individual/small group research projects that will produce interesting, substantive, locally-relevant findings. (2) it will help you become more effective and more confident speakers.

PURPOSE: In order to craft an effective presentation, you need to establish what you intend to communicate to the group. What is your goal for this short presentation? Identify this clearly for yourself; it will help you to create the presentation. Before giving your talk, make sure your goal is being accomplished.

ORGANIZATION: Just as organization is important in your writing, it is also important in your speech, to ensure that the audience understands not only where we are going (your purpose), but what the steps are that will take us there. You need an introduction, main points, transitions, and a conclusion. Your time is short: you can keep each of these elements short and simple, and you do not need many “main points.”

SUPPORT: You will be making claims in your presentation about what you have found; provide support for these claims. You will have several different kinds of data on your topic, make some choices about what is most important to share with us, and what will best help us understand your main ideas.

AUDIENCE: You always want a presentation to reflect the audience you are addressing: when you choose your language, give thought to what you can assume we know (by virtue of taking this course), what you should assume we don’t know (by not having done all of the research on this topic that you have done), and of course be sensitive to issues of audience diversity.

 DELIVERY: This is probably the part people worry the most about – but if you pay attention to the above items, this part should become easier. When you practice your presentation – and you should – take note of your pacing, volume, clarity of speech, etc.

 

***Please do not forget that the Speaking Center is here to SUPPORT YOU. They can work with you at any stage in this process.***

Research present guidelines

 

Here’s the rubric – and I am very available for questions, comments, etc.

Research present rubric

Final Extra Credit/Common read/urban-type activity

Hello again!

I mentioned earlier in the semester that there’d be another common read *extra credit* opportunity event this semester – it is coming up! When we return from Thanksgiving, we will be screening a documentary called “Tested,” and the filmmaker will be present to talk with us afterward..

I’m going to upload the LOVELY flyer for the event (credit: Dominique); and I want to tell you this: I watched this video at a conference last year – and it is IMPORTANT. It is about schooling, about our systems of inequality – it incorporates race, class, gender, neighborhoods, and structures of opportunity. If you can come, I encourage you to do so.

To get the extra credit, after, send me an email about the movie/event.

 

Tested Flyer (2)

Research Presentation Dates

Hiya folks – You did a lovely job of sorting yourselves into presentation dates today. I’m posting the schedule of presentations BY SECTION. I’m waiting for confirmation from a couple of people – but my intent is NOT to move people around at this point.

We will talk about presentations and final papers next week.

Happy Thanksgiving!!

 

Section 1 (9AM)
Dec 5: Kelly, Alexis, Kenzie, Ilana , Shelby, Jordan

Dec 7: Chance, Katie, Ann, Kim, Megan, Stephanie G

Dec 9: Melissa, Brandi, Kaitlynn, Matthew, Emily R, Stephanie W

 

Section 2 (10am)

Dec 5: Alex, Emily S, Emily G, Janaye, Mike

Dec 7: Deziree, Colleen, Nicole, Camille, Alecia, Lilah

Dec 9: Lexy, Dominique, Tori, Kathryn, Alli, Tate

 

Due date for next segment – and UPCOMING

Folks –

I felt A LOT OF PRESSURE TODAY (jk, you know. I was egging you all on…) to re-think the due date for your next paper segment.

You are still VERY WELCOME to turn in segment three as assigned, on Nov.21.

You are also welcome to turn it in on Nov 28, by class time.

 

And while I have your attention, between now and that Monday, your reading assignment is the Kidder article, and to finish any remaining bits of Desmond, Jacobs & Klinenberg. I will assign additional readings for the last 2 days of class led by me.

This Monday – Nov.21 – I will also pass around a sign-up sheet for dates to present on your projects. This is what we will do the last week of class.

 

Questions? Just let me know.

Best,

LM

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